10/6:

It's the first day off amidst the Rocket Mass Heater Jamboree at Wheaton Labs. I've dumped about 200+GB of 4k footage from the first 4 days onto my laptop and a 5TB external hardrive. It's been a blast gathering the footage; less of a blast setting up to capture it because nothing has been stageable. Everything has been "Oh shit they're doing this now," running over to gather what I can as its already in the middlenof what has been going on because there are several builds happening simultaneously and I'm one person with one camera that isn't even my own. I'm learning to work with this incredible Lumix GH4. Gaining my first exposure to what "exposure" truly is from a scientific and artisitic perspective. I've certainly been trying my best to gather great footage with its 4k capabilities set with the system frequency of a stable 24fps.

The event has been utter chaos of course as part of my duty is to man the event as staff to make sure everything is handled for tye attendees while also jumping around the the builds to gather quick segments of video footage before moving on to my other tasks. Making sure supplies are topped off at the "willow feeders"(outdoor poo shacks) which, when handled properly, are far less disgusting than most people would perceive them to be.

Quick rundown: all poo contains pathogens. Most pathogens are inert after 2 months. ALL pathogens are inert after 2 years, so all that "willow candy" is stored for atbleast 2 years before deposited in the willow beds. Willows seem to be the trees that enjoy this sort of fertilizer the most! We refer to them as "Poo Beasts." They just love the pathogen-free nutrients that it provides for them! The key to these systems is making sure to deposit urine outside or have it properly diverted away from the poo containers. Any urine in excess deposited in the cans causes this while system to fail! So it is important to follow these guidelines in order to keep pathogens from entering the watertable/aquifers. Urine is a great nutrient for plants. Especially when it comes to composting. It helps engage the composting process which, when added to a hugelkultur mound, can produce heat from the process excellent for creating warmth within the mounds to protect your plants from frost on those particylarly cold nights and early morning frosts!

This system saves A LOT of water that most of us take for granted being connected tge city water/sewer systems. Imagine the money one could save by not having to flush tons of gallons with each use of a toilet. FORGET those single and double flush shitters we've developed for "conservation" that's like using a band-aid that is far from waterproof and just falls off after a little bit of sweat exuding from the skin. True conservation isn't just using less, but knowing when it's not truly necessary at all.

Anyway.... enough of my water conservation rant. Here's a book I picked up recently to enjoy and another my lovely friend found for me to better understand and build my skills in photography/videography!