Crisp fall mornings, the smell of leaves and their changing colors, coffee brewing, and of course exploring. Just a few of my favorite things about fall.

We have recently had quite a bit of visitors, and we wanted to show them the beautiful UP, during prime fall colors.

1.Tahquamenon Falls (Upper)

(Tuh-kwah-mee-non)

According to Native Stories, the origin of the name came from the waters amber color. The reason the falls has an amber color is because of the leaching of tanic acid from the Cedar and Hemlock Swamps that feed the river.

  1. Sugar Loaf Mountain

The county of Marquette acquired Sugar Loaf around 1930-34, the Works Progress Administration had built steps to get to the mountain as an easier way in year 1938. The steps have been repaired and rebuilt numerous times over many years.

Sitting on top of that mountain was so breath-taking. The pictures does not do it justice. I highly recommend taking a trip to experience this.

  1. Dead River Falls

A fun little hike. Once you walk down the steps you will see 1 water fall, but what you may not know is you can hike a little bit further to find many more.

Hiking through tall pines is unexplainable. This is definitely a must see.

  1. Ore Dock

The first dock ever built for the Iron industry was in Marquette, back in 1857. The Iron Ore would be delivered by train, and the ships would be loaded by hand. Iron Ore would be turned into pellets to make it easier to transport.

Marquette used to have 6 Ore docks, 3 being operated in the lower harbor. The Ore dock that can be seen there today was built in 1931, and closed in 1971 due to market conditions.

There is 1 Ore dock that is still active which is located at Presque Isle. This Ore dock was built in 1911 and ships more than 9 to 10 millions of Iron Ore each Year.

  1. Chapel Falls

Flows down the side of the rock. The falls flow 60 feet down the sandstone cliff on its way to Lake Superior.

  1. Chapel Rockc

Chapel Rock is the remains of Cambrian Age Sandstone that was carves by Lake Nipissing water from 3,800 years ago. At one time there was an archway connected to the rock and the mainland. The Arch had crumbled in the 1940s.

The white pine that is located on Chaple rock is said to be 250 years old.

"May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view. May your mountains rise into and above the clouds." -Edward Abbey