The 290th Hungarian / Saxon fortification on my page is Visk (Вишковo) in Ukraine: it had an old castle but its fortified church is worth visiting for it has the nicest medieval murals in the Subcarpathian region...

The church was built in 1270 by King István V who gave the village of Visk to Master Mykov (Mikó) and Chepán (Csépán) of the Hont-Pázmány Clan, the sons of Marchaleus in 1271. They were the ancestors of the Ujhelyi family.

The inhabitants were mainly Saxon Germans at that time. Soon, the village became part of Máramaros County, and King László IV, as well as King András III, confirmed the family’s ownership.

(...)

Visk was listed among those settlements of the Hungarian Kingdom which played an important role in the transportation of salt. Besides Visk, the main salt-transporting places were Técső, Talaborfalu, and Sziget in 1308.

Salt was a very important product that was exported to Europe in large quantities. It is no wonder that King Károly Róbert awarded the rank of a town to Visk in 1329.

(...)

The murals of the church were painted in the first part of the 15th century, they are remarkable because they were created on a very high artistical level. Compared to similar murals of many Subcarpathian and Transylvanian village churches, these pictures represent a higher quality of artistic skills. More than two-thirds of the church is covered by these breathtaking paintings.

(...)

You can read more about the history of Visk on my page:

https://www.hungarianottomanwars.com/transylvania/visk/