This is the translation of the beginning part of the Okada Toshio's Seminar on April 1st (#224).

I'd like to talk about Evangelion, but I'd like to read Evangelion from the perspective of "visual expression" rather than the theme.

The reason is that I don't really have anything to say about the theme of Evangelion now either, and to be honest, I'm not really interested in it.

It's more like, as well as "Why do Hayao Miyazaki's food scenes look so good?", "Why are Hideaki Anno's destruction scenes so cool?" I want to focus on the fact that.

The Ghibli anime, especially Hayao Miyazaki's food scene, looks really tasty.

The reason is that Hayao Miyazaki himself believes that animation is a device for conveying "reality".

In other words, he defines animation as something that accurately conveys the sensations you experience when you eat something and it tastes good, or when you climb a mountain and it's tired, or whatever.

In the same way, the destruction scenes that Hideaki Anno creates are also cool because he believes that "the moment of destruction is the most beautiful".

He believes, "Its essence is revealed by showing how it breaks," or "A person's existence can be felt only at the moment he disappears," so the expression goes in that direction.

For example, when it comes to depicting romance, Miyazaki Hayao is an artist who wants to portray "what it feels like to be in love with someone else."

On the other hand, Anno Hideaki wants to portray, "how it is hard when you're betrayed by someone else and you realize how much you loved that person for the first time."

This is a difference in the direction of these two artists who convey the "feeling of destruction" and the "feeling of having experienced".

That's why Hideaki Anno's destruction scenes are always beautiful, and even the scenes where blood is spilled make us want to watch them.

<Original JP site: https://ch.nicovideo.jp/ex/blomaga/ar1467572>