1. Focus on the Process and not on the results. When you fall in love with the process rather than the product, you don’t have to wait to permit yourself to be happy.

Happiness is not a destination, it's a journey that we travel every single day. The best way to live a profound and jubilant life is by focusing on the present.

2. All big things come from small beginnings. The seed of every habit is a single, tiny decision. But as that decision is repeated, a habit sprouts and grows stronger. Roots entrench themselves and branches grow. The task of breaking a bad habit is like uprooting a powerful oak within us. And the task of building a good habit is like cultivating a delicate flower one day at a time.

3. Never forget the power of Consistency, persistence and perseverance. The only Shortcut to success is Consistency. In the wise words of James Clear

"When nothing seems to help, I go and look at a stonecutter hammering away at his rock, perhaps a hundred times without as much as a crack showing in it. Yet at the hundred and first blow, it will split in two, and I know it was not that last blow that did it—but all that had gone before."

4. Life is a marathon and not a sprint. Patience is the biggest virtue a man can ever master. Improving by 1 per cent isn’t particularly notable—sometimes it isn’t even noticeable—but it can be far more meaningful, especially in the long run. The difference a tiny improvement can make over time is astounding. Here’s how the math works out: if you can get 1 per cent better each day for one year, you’ll end up thirty-seven times better by the time you’re done. Conversely, if you get 1 per cent worse each day for one year, you’ll decline nearly down to zero. What starts as a small win or a minor setback accumulates into something much more.

5. What you think, you become. period.

Negative thoughts compound. The more you think of yourself as worthless, stupid, or ugly, the more you condition yourself to interpret life that way. You get trapped in a thought loop. The same is true for how you think about others. Once you fall into the habit of seeing people as angry, unjust, or selfish, you see that kind of people everywhere

6. Habits are the compound interest of self-improvement. In the same way that money multiplies through compound interest, the effects of your habits multiply as you repeat them. They seem to make little difference on any given day and yet the impact they deliver over the months and years can be enormous. It is only when looking back two, five, or perhaps ten years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.

7. Bamboo trees are barely seen over the surface for the first 5 years of their growth, whereby they build an extensive root system, and then just within 6, weeks they shoot up to ninety feet.